Frequently Asked Questions

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Send us an email: info@endurobearings.com

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We will make every effort to respond same day or next business day at the latest.

Our office hours are 9am to 5pm Pacific Standard Time, Monday thru Friday.

Shipping & Returns

A comprehensive overview of Enduro's Shipping & Returns policies can be found here.

Domestic Shipments (within USA)

- Orders are processed within 2 business days and usually next day.

- Orders are not processed on weekends and holidays. 

- Orders over $150 include free UPS or USPS 5-7 day delivery. 

- Orders under $150 or expedited deliveries  (next day or two day) will include shipping charges.

-Shipping costs will be displayed at checkout.

A comprehensive overview of Enduro's Shipping & Returns policies can be found here.

International Shipments

We suggest contacting a local retailer to purchase Enduro products. If this is not possible, Enduro USA will fulfill your order. 

- You will be responsible for paying all freight costs which will be displayed at checkout.

- You will also be responsible for paying all import, duties and VAT fees at time of delivery.  These fees will NOT BE displayed at checkout.

Given the immense variety of bearing and component designs and specifications required to properly serve all brands of bikes, the most expeditious and accurate way to ensure you receive the best advice on Enduro product availability in your country is to first contact Enduro USA.

Send us an email: info@endurobearings.com  And include as much information as possible, such as:

- your city and country.

- bicycle brand and model.

- the bearings and components you wish to purchase.

Enduro has partners around the world and we will quickly connect you to a local retailer or distributor that stocks the Enduro products you're looking for.

There is always a chance that your local retailer and our distribution partners will not have the Enduro products you need. While not the most affordable option, Enduro USA accepts worldwide consumer direct orders to ensure you are riding on the world's best performing, most dependable bearings and components.

We are sorry for the inconvenience! 

A comprehensive overview of Enduro's Shipping & Returns policies can be found here.

Here's a next steps brief: 

- Email us at info@endurobearings.com Include your order number and a brief description of the mistake we made or shipping damage.  Include a photo of the damaged products. 

- We will send you a return shipping label and make every effort to replace the products as quickly as possible.

Sorry this happened! 

A comprehensive overview of Enduro's Shipping & Returns policies can be found here.

Here's a next steps brief:

Email us at info@endurobearings.com. Please include your order number and the correct Enduro part numbers and quantities for the products you'd like to purchase. 

Enduro will enter an order on your behalf, email the details for your review and payment. Once payment is received, the order will ship within one business day.  

If you are not sure which items you need, let us know and include your phone number in your email. Our knowledgable tech support crew will contact you ASAP, usually within one or two business days.

We are sorry to hear this but sometimes things happen. 

A comprehensive overview of Enduro's Shipping & Returns policies can be found here.

Here's a next steps brief:

Email us at info@endurobearings.com. Include your order number and reason for the refund request. 

You can receive a refund for your order by carefully following Enduro Bearings Refund Policy:

- Products must be returned to Enduro within 30 days of receiving the order. 

- Products must be unused, undamaged and in their original, unopened packaging.

- Should your returned products arrive in 'as new' condition, Enduro will issue a refund with a 15% restocking fee deducted. 

It may take three to four weeks to process your refund. The time period includes transit time back to Enduro Bearings (5-10 days), processing and inspection time (3-5 days) and bank processing time (5-10 days). 

Warranty

Fork seals are fragile. Enduro will only replace fork seals prior to installation that arrive damaged or show signs of poor materials or workmanship.

To enter a warranty claim, please review our product category coverages and policies; then follow the step-by-step instructions found here.

Pro Tips: Ordering The Correct Bearings, Components, Fork Seals & Tools

In some cases yes but the information is not always accurate. Bicycle companies make model year specification changes and may not update the bearing product information in the owner's manual or on their websites. 

The only sure way to identify bearing types and sizes are to remove the bearings from your bicycle and carefully measure the bearings with an accurate, pro-level caliper. 

Enduro's Product Page Bearing Finder:

To easily locate your Enduro bearing options, open the product category page (bottom bracket bearings, hub bearings, headset bearings, suspension pivot bearings) and use our bearing finder! 

With pro-grade accurate calipers, measure the bearing's outside diameter, inside diameter and width. Then click the matching boxes on our search engine to locate the options we offer in that particular size. 

If you don't have calipers, you can also search by entering the bearing identification number etched on the outer bearing race or molded into the seal. There are occasions when this number is incorrect and not all bearings include an identification number. Proceed with caution.

Yes you can but proceed with a bit of caution. Sometimes the number on the outside bearing race is incorrect. The guy running the laser etching machine messed-up, possibly it was the Monday after a rough weekend.

The only sure way to identify bearings are to remove the bearings from your bike and carefully measure them with an accurate, pro-grade caliper.

Enduro's Product Page Bearing Finder:

To easily locate your Enduro bearing options, open the product category page (bottom bracket bearings, hub bearings, headset bearings, suspension pivot bearings) and use our bearing finder!

With pro-grade calipers, measure the bearing's outside diameter, inside diameter and width. Then click the matching boxes on our search engine to locate the options we offer in that particular size. 

If you don't have calipers, you can also search by entering the bearing identification number etched on the outer bearing race or molded into the seal. As noted above, there are occasions when this number is incorrect and some bearing manufacturers don't include identification numbers. Proceed with caution. 

To easily locate your bearing options, use the bearing finder on Enduro's product pages (hubs, suspension pivots, bottom brackets, headsets)!

With pro-grade accurate calipers, measure the bearing's outside diameter, inside diameter and width. Then click the matching boxes on our search engine to locate the options we offer in that particular size. 

If you don't have calipers, you can also search by entering the bearing identification number etched on the outer bearing race or molded into the seal. There are occasions when the bearing don't include and identification number has been mislabeled. Proceed with caution. 

In the vast majority of cases, yes. 

But...if you've read our cautionary tale regarding bearing identification, the same holds true with bottom brackets. Sometimes bike manufacturers make mid-year specification changes on the same model, such as a switch from press-fit BBs to threaded BBs without updating their consumer-facing information.

The only way to be 100% certain of the bottom bracket type and size is to remove the BB, measure the frame's BB shell width and inner diameter.  Then correctly identify the crank set maker, model and spindle diameter.

After gathering all these specifications, visit Enduro's bottom bracket product page, enter the information in our BB search engine to review the models offered for your application.

To easily locate Enduro bottom bracket bearing options available for your bike and drivetrain use the bearing finder search engine on our Bottom Bracket Bearings product page.

Enter your bottom bracket specifications (press-fit, threaded, ...) and crankset manufacturer details (Shimano model, SRAM model, Campy model) in the search engine to review options for your specific application. 

In the vast majority of cases, yes. 

But...if you've read our cautionary tale regarding bearing identification, the same holds true with headsets. 

The only way to be 100% certain of your headset type and size is to remove both top and bottom bearings and identify the bearing type. Then use a pro-grade accurate caliper to measure the inner and outer diameters and widths of BOTH the upper and lower bearings (they may be different sizes).  

After gathering all these specifications, visit Enduro's headset bearing product page, enter the information in our headset bearing finder to review the models offered for your application.

There are wide variety of frame head tube designs, including external cup, drop-in, zero stack that may include loose balls (non-cartridge style), angular contact or radial bearings.

To easily locate Enduro headset bearing options available for your bike and drivetrain use the Headset Bearing Finder search engine on our headset product page.

Rear derailleur jockey wheels (pulleys) vary based on the drivetrain manufacturer and the intended use (road, gravel, or MTB).

All Enduro jockey wheels are equipped with XD15 ceramic-hybrid bearings and include a limited lifetime warranty.

We offer the following models: Shimano MTB 11 & 12-speed; Shimano Road 11-speed; Shimano Gravel 11-speed.SRAM MTB 11 & 12-speed; SRAM Road 11 & 12-speed; SRAM Gravel 11 & 12-speed.Plus a few additional configurations.

Enduro manufactures a number of tools that make the process simple and safe on a wide range of bottom bracket configurations. 

The best tools for removing and replacing just the bearings in your bottom bracket are the BRT-002 (for 30mm ID bearings) and BRT-003 (for 24mm ID bearings). 

Both of these tools allow you to easily remove the bearings from most bottom bracket assemblies without having to remove the cups from the frame set. Note that BSA30 and DUB bottom brackets DO require removing the cups from the frame set AND the use of the BRT-018 adapter with the BRT-002. We also make a 29mm adapter kit (BRT-016) for the BRT-002 for removal of 29mm DUB bearings.

Most modern headsets use drop-in bearings. Like integrated (drop-in) headsets, you can change these bearings without any tools other than those required to remove the stem and fork. The bearings can be removed or installed with you fingers. 

To remove the headset bearing cups and install a new headset assembly, like Maxhit or an external cup system like HDK-0008 or HDK-0007,  you will need a cup removal tool that fits inside the bike frame's head tube, then expands to allow you to drive out the cups from the opposite side. The most popular bike shop tool is manufactured by Park Tool, though a hammer and punch wielded by an experienced and careful hand can drive the cups out as well.

For installation, a "long" headset press such as Enduro's BRT-050 is recommended to ensure proper alignment. The BRT-050 comes with a variety of guides to install most common headset sizes.

Enduro designs and manufactures a number of tools to help make removing and replacing hub bearings an easier process. For removal, we offer two versions of the classic slide-hammer/blind-bearing puller BBT-100 and BBT-222. The BRT-222 also converts into a mallet with replaceable heads. 

The BRT-030 punch set is also a great time saver for when you have access to the back side of the bearings. The punches are sized to precisely fit into the ID of the most common bearing sizes and allow you to simply knock them out with a single stroke.

Many mechanics prefer to press bearings out as well as pressing them back in, for that purpose we make the BRT-050 and BRT-005 bearing presses. The BRT-050 includes a short bearing press that is ideally suited for tight quarters commonly found when working on suspension bearings and a longer version for hubs. When used with the proper guide kit like the BRT-051 you can remove and replace most of the common sizes of suspension bearings without any violence. For hubs, a full complement of inner (BBT-005) and outer (BBT-004) guides makes the process smoother, though we do make a guide kit that is specifically aimed at DT Swiss hub bearings (BBT-013) that hits many of the more common hub bearing sizes used throughout the industry.

Pro Tips: Bearing Types, Materials, Performance & Durability

Yes there is! Visit our TECHNOLOGY pages for an informative and objective semi-deep dive into:

- Bearing Types with ideal industrial and bicycle applications for each.

- International ABEC ratings and I.D. numbers.

- Bearing Ball and Bearing Race materials; from 52100 chromium steel to stainless to ceramic with ideal bicycle applications for each.

- Bearing Seal options; from single-lip to double-lip, light to firm contact with ideal  bicycle applications for each.

- Bearing grease options; from light to heavy viscosity with ideal applications for each.

At Enduro, we somewhat agree. A 52100 chromium steel ABEC5 hub bearing, for example, spins fast on day one and is very affordable. Frankly, most every quality bearing, regardless of material make-up is quite smooth and efficient when new.

It's father time, harsh riding conditions and lack of proper maintenance that destroys bike bearings, sometimes within a few weeks under a high-mileage rider. And this is when and where Enduro's ceramic-hybrid line (XD15 and Zero) shine best.

Importantly, not all ceramic bearings are the same, some varieties from other manufacturers deteriorate rather quickly.  Enduro's XD15 bearings actually get smoother and faster over time as a result of our grade 5 ceramic balls spinning within the XD15 nitrogen steel races.  

Checkout this hub bearing test comparing Enduro XD15 and Enduro Zero ceramic-hybrid bearings against two leading ceramic bearing competitors.

Our bearings show little or no wear, finishing first and second in the test. The other two test participants clearly show premature aging. 

If you don't like servicing you bike (ever!) and top-end performance is the name of your game, purchase Enduro XD15 bearings and components. They include a lifetime guarantee, get faster the more you ride and are the best bicycle bearings in the world.

Enduro's 52100 Chromium Steel ABEC3 and ABEC5 bearings are affordable, precise, high quality spinners. And we don't compromise quality on ABEC3 and ABEC5 bearing seals and grease.  These bearings thrive in dry climates, on road bikes and when serviced one to three times a year by a professional mechanic with the proper R&R tools and training.

Proper service is a must. Chromium steel bearings are highly allergic to water, salt, dirt, muck, mud, sand and spilled energy drinks. 

If you ride in dirty, grimy, salty, wet weather. If you conveniently forget to properly service you bike. If you are a high-mileage rider, a big-hit MTB rider, or a rider that watches watts like a Wall Street commodities trader...you should opt-in Enduro's line high-grade 440C high-grade stainless steel bearings or XD15 ceramic-hybrid bearings. 

Visit Enduro Bearing Basics to learn more.

MAXhit patent-pending bottom brackets and headsets feature bigger 440C stainless steel balls riding in deeper 440C stainless steel grooves. Guaranteed for life, MAXhit components withstand double the load of traditional cartridge bearing-in-cup designs and continue to roll efficiently fast after months of big impact, gnarly riding.

Learn more about the latest Enduro innovation here.

Standard chromium steel bearings perform well on day one but will seeming rust overnight when subjected to wet weather, mud, sand, salt and muck.

Enduro offers a series of performance upgrades at various price points that increase durability and longevity in UK-like environments. Each of the following options includes either a lifetime or two-year warranty:

- 440C stainless steel hub, bottom bracket and headset bearings

- MAXhit 440C stainless steel components

- Black Oxide coated MAX suspension pivot bearings

- Zero coated ceramic-hybrid bearings

- XD15 ceramic-hybrid bearings and components

Visit Enduro Bearing Basics to learn more.

MAX bearings were pioneered specifically to solve premature bearing failures in high-load, high impact, low rotational speed MTB suspension systems. By eliminating the ball retainer from the bearing, space becomes available to add additional balls (aka full-complement), which dramatically increases load capacity 35% to 40%. This also significantly increases bearing reliability and longevity. 

MAX suspension bearings are filled with Enduro MAX ‘extra high pressure’ grease and represent today’s industry-standard among bicycle manufactures. 

Visit Enduro Innovations to learn more.

While there are identical bearing sizes used in wheel hubs and suspension pivots, installing MAX bearings in wheel hubs, or fast-spinning Enduro hub bearings in suspension pivots is unadvisable. 

To optimize performance and reduce drag, Enduro hub bearings include bearing ball retainer rings, low viscosity speed grease a light contact, dual-lip LLB seals. The make-up of a high-performance hub bearing is a serious mismatch for the demands encountered in modern MTB suspension designs.

Conversely, Enduro MAX full-compliment suspension bearings only rotate a few degrees and are engineered to withstand 1000's of high-load, jarring impacts. MAX bearings do not include retaining rings which provides space for additional balls (increasing load capacity 35-40%), extra thick, high-pressure grease and full-contact, double-lip LLU seals. These design features are a perfect match for suspension pivot bearings, but way too burly and sloth-y for bicycle hubs. Also, to assemble a full-complement radial bearing, it requires that a fill slot be ground into the inner and outer races to allow the additional bearings to be inserted into the races, which makes the bearing design not particularly well suited to withstand the axial loads found in hubs and BBs.

Visit Enduro Bearing Basics to learn more.

ABEC Ratings (Annular Bearing Engineer’s Committee) are manufacturing and testing standards that each bearing must pass. These include noise testing at high RPM, precisely defined tolerances for inside and outside bearing diameters, roundness of ball, trueness of races, and the surface finish for all of the above. ABEC ratings are numbered 1 thru 9, odd numbers only, with 9 being the best possible rating. A bearing with a 7 or 9 rating is very difficult and expensive to manufacture, might be perfect for a 40,000 rpm dental hand piece, but is overkill for the slow rotational speeds of bicycle cranks and wheels.

Some aspects of ABEC ratings are important for bicycle bearings, but not all. In fact, a high ABEC rating does not mean the bearing spins with less drag, nor does it necessarily equate to high performance, long lasting bearings.  ABEC standards do not account for critical bicycle performance influencers such as load handling capabilities, ball grade and precision, Rockwell hardness, bearing seal quality or lubrication specification. This can lead to confusion in the bicycle marketplace.

Visit Enduro Bearing Basics to learn more.

At Enduro, we use a variety of bearing seal designs and grease formulas depending on the application. For example a high contact double-lip seal that is perfect for a headset or suspension bearing is way too "friction-y" for a hub, pedal or bottom bracket bearing.

Visit Enduro Bearings Basics to learn more about the seals and greases we use for each unique bicycle bearing application.

Pro Tips: Bearing R & R and Trouble Shooting

It is often a long, frustrating journey to find and cure creaky bike syndrome. It is true that bottom brackets can make noise, especially press-fit BBs. This said, noises can migrate and mislead much like a bad back can cause pain or numbness in a person's leg.

We recommend checking a few things before removing your crank and bottom bracket:

- start by fully cleaning and lubricating the bike.

- remove your rear wheel, clean the interface between the dropouts and hub. Clean and add a bit of lubricant to your quick release or thru axel.

- while the rear wheel is removed, remove your derailleur hanger, clean the mating surface with the frame, check for cracks and reinstall to proper torque specs. Also check that the cassette (gear cluster) isn't slightly loose.

- remove the front wheel, clean the interface between the dropouts and hub. Clean and add a bit of lubricant to your quick release or thru axel.

- flex the spokes on both wheels and wiggle the valve stems.

- ensure the headset, stem, fork interface is properly adjusted and tightened. Clamp the front wheel between your legs and torque on the bars. If you hear the noise it's either the bar/stem or the headset.

- rotate your crank arms to the botom of the stroke and applying pressure to the outside on one pedal spindle, then the other, checking pedal bearing wear (indexing and/or end-play) repeat this process multiple times from both sides of the bike. If you consistently hear the noise it is probably drive or frame set related if you have already checked the wheels and cockpit.

- check that the chainring bolts are properly tightened.

- remove or replace your pedals, with fresh grease on the threads and properly torqued

- check for internal cable rattling by lightly bouncing your bike on the floor.

- remove, clean and reinstall the seat post. Flex the seat on the seat rails, up and down and side to side. Disassemble, clean and lubricate the mating surfaces and threads of the seat clamp assembly (not on the seat rails) if there is any noise.

If all the above doesn't locate and cure the creaks and squeaks, take a break. Return in 30 minutes, go to the next FAQ which specifically covers bottom bracket noises and remedies.

As a matter of course, going about noise isolation should be a very deliberate process. When the usual suspects (see above) are not the culprit, we recommend starting at front of the bike and methodically remove, clean, lubricate and reinstall every bike part until the noise is gone. Pro Tip: The process goes quicker when you have common replacement parts handy such as cables, bar tape, and bearings.

Finally, if the noise remains after a methodical nose-to-tail rebuild,  using a bright light carefully examine your frame and fork for cracks.

Due to the original (OEM) frame and bottom bracket component design, it is often impossible to eliminate press-fit bottom bracket noise. Bearings rotating inside independent left and right side aluminum cups that are pressed into frames provides a safe haven for noisemakers.  

Enduro designed the Torqtite bottom brackets to overcome these problems. The Torqtite design replaces the press-in cups with a thread-together, mechanical solution system that provides a secure creak-free solution while also improving left side/right side bearing to crank spindle alignment.

Read more about Torqtite BBs in Enduro Innovations here

There can be a number of sources for rear wheel noise, most often it's neither the bearings or the wheel assembly. Derailleur hangers and quick releases are award winning noisemakers. 

The best approach for identifying the source of the noise is process of elimination. If you think the noise is coming from the rear wheel, try a different wheel. If the noise disappears, then it was coming from the wheel. If it doesn't, it's coming from somewhere else. Continue with a process of elimination (see FAQ "I can't locate my noise" above)

So, what causes noises in wheels and how do you fix them? 

A ticking sound can come from loose or spokes with uneven tension. Re-tension and true the wheel.

Scraping or rubbing sounds, in most cases, come from worn disc brake pads or a bent rotor. BUT can also be caused by very worn bearings or a loose or worn axle. Check brakes pads and the rotor for wear and tear first.

Hubs very rarely creak unless there is something very wrong with one of the component parts, such as a crack in the shell or axle. Fully examine and replace any cracked, worn or broken parts.

Grinding can come from extremely dirty or worn bearings or when dirt and sand get between the bearings and the axle caps. Should this be the case, remove, clean and re-grease every component in the hub assembly.

Only use retainer glue when there is zero press fit or interference fit of your bearing into a bearing bore. This can happen with years of wear on aluminum bearing cups. 

If the bearing easily drops out of the bore, or you can easily press the bearing in with your fingers and no tools, a very small coating of Loctite or bearing retaining compound can help keep this point quiet. It is common practice to mount bearings this way. On some bikes and components, you will simply be replacing what was already there. 

Please note: Be careful that the retaining compound never overflows onto surfaces where it doesn't belong, such as the face of the bearing or anywhere near the lips of the seals, as this can effect optimal bearing performance. 

This depends on how much you ride and what conditions you are riding in. Sunny days only with occasional dusty conditions? Once a year is probably a good service period. 

Riding in rain and mud frequently? Sweating a lot or spilling energy drinks? Then every 3 months is probably the schedule for you.

Pro Tip: To check your bottom bracket bearings for wear, hand turn the crankset with the chain off. If you can feel roughness or indexing, or hear a crunchy sound, it's time to service your bottom bracket bearings. This is also a "service warning light" for all the bearings on your bike as the BB is usually the first to indicate that it's time for a thorough cleaning and re-grease. 

How to service radial bearings including seal removal: Please watch our service video for removing bearing seals, cleaning and re-greasing your bearings.

How to service Enduro Torqtite bottom bracket bearings: Please watch our Torqtite BB service video.

For best results, we recommend re-greasing with Enduro XD15 Speed grease. Enduro's all-rounder Performance grease is a worthy second option.

Enduro's BRT-002 (30mm) or BRT-003 (24mm) work great for removing standard press-fit bottom brackets. In situations where the tool only removes the bearing and not the entire cup, then it may require driving the cup out, from the inside, with a punch. Be careful that the punch only touches/engages with the bearing cup. You can damage the frame when the punch also touches the surrounding bottom bracket shell material.

We recommend replacing the original press-fit bottom bracket with a Torqtite bottom bracket that installs with standard BB cup tools and provides a solid, mechanical engagement that eliminates creaking and improves bearing-to-crank spindle alignment. 

Enduro also makes a range of cup wrenches for a variety of frame set and crankset specifications.

Enduro makes a few different tools to install threaded bottom bracket cups:

BBT-001 for Shimano & X-Drive external cups

BBT-015 is a great double duty tool for BSA and Italian external cup BBs (24mm & 30mm)

BBT-029 works for BSA and Italian external cup BBs (29mm/DUB & 30mm)

All three tools require a 3/8" drive to install or remove the cups. A torque wrench is highly recommended for final installation.

Enduro makes a nifty little tool that allows to to precisely set the preload on your Shimano crankset. 

The BBT-001/B fits directly into the Shimano preload cap, allowing you to set the precise torque via a 3/8" drive on the back side of the tool. The tool is engraved with a convenient reminder of the recommended Corsa bottom bracket bearings torque specification (5-7N). The 45° angular contact design of Enduro XD15 Corsa bearings requires a surprisingly high amount of preload to function properly. They will feel tight compared to most other BB bearings initially, but after a break-in period they will last and spin forever.

To attain proper preload on other cranksets, please utilize the 0.6mm wave washer provided with the Enduro Corsa bottom bracket. Adjust the spacers on the spindle so that the 0.6mm (heavy) wave washer is almost, but not completely flat when the crankset is completely installed. Some cranksets include a preload adjuster on the non-drive side crank arm that will allow you to accomplish the same task without spacers, though sometimes it requires both.

As mentioned above, the BBT-001/B is great for setting preload on Shimano cranksets 

For SRAM GXP and DUB you will need to utilize a 0.4mm wave washer (0.6mm for XD-15 Corsa). To attain proper preload on other cranksets, please utilize the appropriate wave washer provided with the Enduro Corsa bottom bracket. Adjust the spacers on the spindle so that the wave washer is almost, but not completely flat when the crankset is completely installed. Some cranksets include a preload adjuster on the non-drive side crank arm that will allow you to accomplish the same task without spacers, though sometimes it requires both.

This depends on how much you ride and what conditions you are riding in. Sunny days only with occasional dusty conditions? Once a year is probably a good service period. 

Riding in rain and mud frequently? Lots of sweating or spilling energy drinks? Then every three months is probably the schedule for you.

Pro Tip: To check headset bearings, grab the top tube and lift the front wheel off the ground; then with your other hand, lightly rotate the handlebars back-and-forth. If you feel indexing or roughness or hear a crunchy sound, service your headset bearings immediately.

How to service radial bearings including seal removal: Please watch our service video for removing bearing seals, cleaning and re-greasing bearings.

For best results, we recommend re-greasing with high viscosity, high-pressure Enduro MAX grease. 

Most Zero-Stack headsets use drop in bearings similar to integrated (drop-in) headsets. You can change those without any tools other than those required to remove the stem and fork. The bearings can be removed or installed with you fingers. 

To remove the headset bearing cups and install a new headset assembly, like Maxhit, you will need a cup removal tool that fits inside the bike frame's head tube, then expands to allow you to drive out the cups from the opposite side. The most popular bike shop tool is manufactured by Park Tool, though a hammer and punch wielded by an experienced and careful hand can drive the cups out as well.

For installation, a "long" headset press such as Enduro's BRT-050 is recommended to ensure proper alignment when installing new Maxhit bearings or zero-stack cups. The BRT-050 comes with a variety of guides to install most common headset sizes.

Most modern headsets use easy-to-replace integrated 'drop-in' bearings. You can change these without any tools other than those required to remove the stem and fork. The bearings can be removed or installed with you fingers. 

To remove the headset bearing cups and install a new headset assembly, like Maxhit or an external cup system like HDK-0008 or HDK-0007,  you will need a cup removal tool that fits inside the bike frame's head tube, then expands to allow you to drive out the cups from the opposite side. The most popular bike shop tool is manufactured by Park Tool, though a hammer and punch wielded by an experienced and careful hand can drive the cups out as well.

For installation, a "long" headset press such as Enduro's BRT-050 is recommended to ensure proper alignment. The BRT-050 comes with a variety of guides to install most common headset sizes.

To remove the headset bearing cups and install a new headset assembly, like Maxhit or an external cup system like HDK-0008 or HDK-0007,  you will need a cup removal tool that fits inside the bike frame's head tube, then expands to allow you to drive out the cups from the opposite side. The most popular bike shop tool is manufactured by Park Tool, though a hammer and punch wielded by an experienced and careful hand can drive the cups out as well.

For installation, a "long" headset press such as Enduro's BRT-050 is recommended to ensure proper alignment. The BRT-050 comes with a variety of guides to install most common headset sizes.

This depends on how much you ride and what conditions you are riding in. 

Sunny days only with occasional dusty conditions? Once a year is probably a good service period. 

Riding in rain and mud frequently? Sweating a lot or spilling energy drinks? Then every three months is probably the schedule for you.

Pro Tip:

Remove your wheels, then hand turn the inner bearing race with a forefinger. If you can feel roughness or indexing, or hear a crunchy sound, it's time to service your hub bearings and cassette body bearings. 

How to service Enduro hub bearings including seal removal: Please watch our service video for removing bearing seals, cleaning and re-greasing your bearings.

For best results, we recommend re-greasing with Enduro XD15 Speed grease. Enduro's all-rounder Performance grease is a worthy second option.

Enduro has designed and manufactured a number of tools to help make the process of removing and replacing hub bearings easier. For removal, we offer two versions of the classic slide-hammer/blind-bearing puller BBT-100 and BBT-222. The BRT-222 also converts into a mallet with replaceable heads. 

The BRT-030 punch set is a great time saver for when you have access to the back side of the bearings. The punches are sized to precisely fit into the ID of most common bearing sizes and allow you to simply knock them out with a single slide hammer stroke.

Many mechanics prefer to press bearings out as well as pressing them back in. For this approach, we offer the BRT-050 and BRT-005 bearing presses. A full complement of inner (BBT-005) and outer (BBT-004) guides helps ensures a smooth R&R process and make a guide kit that is specifically aimed at DT Swiss hub bearings (BBT-013) that hits many of the more common hub bearing sizes used throughout the industry.

Enduro makes a number of tools to improve the process of removing and replacing hub bearings. For removal, we offer two versions of the classic slide-hammer/blind-bearing puller BBT-100 and BBT-222. The BRT-222 also converts into a mallet with replaceable heads. 

Many mechanics prefer to press bearings out as well as pressing them back in. For this approach we offer the BRT-050 and BRT-005 bearing presses. A full complement of inner (BBT-005) and outer (BBT-004) guides helps immeasurably and we sell a guide kit specifically aimed at DT Swiss hub bearings (BBT-013) that also works for many common hub bearing sizes used throughout the industry.

This depends on how much you ride and what conditions you are riding in. 

Sunny days only with occasional dusty conditions? Once a year is probably a good service period. 

Riding in rain and mud frequently? Sweating a lot or spilling energy drinks? Every three months is probably the schedule for you.

Pro Tip:

Remove the suspension pivot bolts and spacers to easily access all suspension bearings. Then hand turn the inner bearing race on each pivot bearing with a forefinger. If you can feel roughness or indexing, or hear a crunchy sound, it's time to service your bearings. 

How to service Enduro bearings including seal removal: Please watch our service video for removing bearing seals, cleaning and re-greasing your bearings.

For best results, we recommend re-greasing with high viscosity, high-pressure Enduro MAX grease. 

Enduro makes a number of tools to professionally and easily remove and replace suspension bearings. For removal, we make two versions of the classic slide-hammer/blind-bearing puller BBT-100 and BBT-222. The BRT-222 also converts into a mallet with replaceable heads. 

The BRT-030 punch set is also a great time saver for when you need to access the back side of bearings. The punches are sized to precisely fit into the ID of the most common bearing sizes and allows you to simply knock the bearings out with a single slide hammer stroke.

Many mechanics prefer to press bearings out as well as pressing them back in, for that purpose we make the BRT-050 and BRT-005 bearing presses. The BRT-050 includes a short bearing press that is ideally suited for tight quarters commonly found when working on modern rear suspension designs. When used with the proper guide kit, such as the BRT-051, you can remove and replace most  common suspension bearings sizes without complication.